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Learning to Drive in Falkirk

The national average driving lessons required to pass the practical driving test is 47 hours with a driving instructor and an additional 22 hours of private practice with a family or friend are recommended.

Falkirk’s Driving Test pass rate compared to other cities across the UK is roughly the same as the national average sitting at 50.9%.

The test centres in Falkirk are Grangemouth which has a pass rate of 49.9%, Stirling at 47.0%, Airdrie at 49.8%, and Livingston at 56.9%.

The nearest additional driving test centres for Falkirk are in Dunfermline with 52.3%, Glasgow with 46.5%, Bishopbriggs with 54.9% and Hamilton which has a slightly lower pass rate of 54.2%

Falkirk Practical Driving Test Centres

  • Airdrie, (Falkirk), (wheelchair accessible), 7 Aitchison Street, Sword Street, Airdries ML6 0DA
  • Bishopbriggs, (Falkirk), Crosshill Road, Bishopbriggs, Glasgow G64 2QA
  • Dunfermline, (Falkirk), Vine Conference Centre, 131 Garvock Hill, Dunfermline, KY11 4JU
  • Glasgow, (Falkirk), 341 Springhill Parkway, Business Park, Glasgow G69 6GA
  • Grangemouth, (Falkirk), Unit 7 Grangemouth Business Centre, 3 Roseland Hall Grangemouth FK3 8WJ
  • Hamilton, (Falkirk), 30 Selkirk Street, South Hamilton ML3 6RQ
  • Livingston, (Falkirk), (wheelchair accessible) Houston Industrial Estate, Livingston EH54 5DE
  • Stirling, (Falkirk), (wheelchair accessible), Government Buildings, 2 St Ninians Road, Stirling FK8 2HF

Falkirk Theory Test Centres

  • Glasgow, (Falkirk), Third Floor, Empire House 131 West Nile Street, Glasgow G1 2RX
  • Lanark, (Falkirk), Ground floor, St Nichols Church, Castlegate, Lanark ML11 9DZ
  • Stirling, (Falkirk), Suite 2, Part of Unit 1, Ground Floor, Lomond Court, Castle Business Park, Stirling FK9 4TU

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Falkirk – did you know?

  1. The name “Falkirk” originates from the Gaelic word egglesbrech which means “the speckled church”. Over time, this changed to “Fawkirk” and then today’s “Falkirk”. Some historians believe the town name refers to the early church at this site which was said to have been made from speckled stone.
  2. The Antonine Wall, dating from the second century, is one of the largest building projects undertaken by the Romans. The northern frontier border stretched from Clyde to Forth and now has UNESCO World Heritage status.
  3. The Falkirk Steeple was built in 1814 for the princely sum of £1660. In 1927 it was struck by lightning, destroying the spire and scattering parts of the roof in all directions. The steeple was repaired and remains a feature of the town’s skyline today.
  4. The Battle of Falkirk in 1298, was one of the major battles in the First War of Scottish Independence. The English army was led by King Edward I of England while the Scots were led by William Wallace. The English won and Wallace resigned as Guardian of Scotland.
  5. Irn-Bru was invented in Falkirk by Robert Barr in 1875. It was initially sold as an ‘aerated water’, and then launched as a soft drink in 1901 by Robert’s son Andrew who changed the name to ‘Strachan’s Brew’.
  6. Gordon Ramsay lived in Falkirk for 18 years and said the place had an incredible community that was safe and perfect for raising a family.
  7. To link the Forth and Clyde Canals, the Falkirk Wheel was invented to replace a staircase of 11 locks that took boast a day to pass through. Instead of using the locks, the Falkirk wheel lifts boats with a gondola holding 500,000 litres of water to an elevated canal that leads to the higher level canal. The feat of engineering relies on the principles discovered by the mathematician Archimedes.